Handles With Ease

Use scrap polymer clay to adapt any number of polymer clay tools. Cure the polymer clay on the tool. After it cools, pop it off, add a bit of super glue, & pop it back on.

Clockwise from left: needle tool, burnisher, blade, impression tool, drills (2), X-acto blade

Clockwise from left: needle tool, burnisher, blade, impression tool, drills (2), X-acto blade

With the addition of a polymer clay handle, an ordinary needle or yarn needle becomes a needle tool, useful for starting bead holes.

Fold a small scrap of clay over the dull edge of your blade. You’ll be more likely to keep the sharp edge down.

Add a handle, & a square, bead becomes a cool impression tool. The square impression with the hole in the center has a retro feel. Imagine all the other bead shapes that could make great impressions.

Save money on drills when you buy just the drill bits & add your own handles. Make a starter hole in your raw bead with the needle tool, then enlarge the hole with a drill after the bead is cured..

If you do nothing else, take a few minutes to make handles for your X-acto blades. Custom handles make them much easier to work with than store-bought handles.

One of these things is not like the others. The burnisher is actually all polymer clay—the smooth, flat bottom is great for healing seams in raw polymer clay. Place a sheet of deli wrap (don’t let it wrinkle) or 200-grit sandpaper on the seam & rub gently. Just takes patience.

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